TEMPLATE
About the unit/ Where this unit fits
LIFE IN THE MIDDLE AGES (A History and Literature approach)
Task sequence:
Block A: HISTORY
  • Buildings: Castles, Monasteries, Abbeys, Norman houses, Poor man’s houses.(subtasks)
  • Village life (subtasks)
  • Town life (subtasks)
Feudal Europe between IX and XI centuries.
Medieval Europe presents a geographical framework and explains the birth of feudalism and the feudal vassalage and manor/noble relationships.
Power , economy and society show the feudal characteristics
Economic organization within the feudal framework.
Society: social classes
Function of each of the social classes: internal division depending on richness or legal condition.
Their own way of life. The characteristics of their place of residence: castles, monasteries or peasant village. Everyday life.
Romanesque art which materializes the architectural, sculpture and painting of these times.
Block B: LITERACY (Bringing the past to life)
  • The Canterbury Tales: The Life of Geoffrey Chaucer ,The Prologue, The Wife of Bath’s Tale, Thomas Becket, The City of Canterbury (subtasks)
Block C: A summer course at Canterbury Language school. (Final task)
Basic competences: Learning to learn, co-operative learning, digital competence.








Prior Learning
Language used in the unit
Important Resources
Students know the origins of Feudalism.
They know about feudal society.
They know about the king and his vassals.
They know some of the most well-known medieval castles.
They know the peasants in the feudal world.
They know the Christian church: the clergy.
They know the monk’s life and distinguish the parts and functions of a monastery.
Language related to Medieval Ages:
Nouns: Middle Ages, castles, gateway, wall, soldier, knight, Queen, King.
Verbs: cross over, go through, enemy, yard, approach.
Structures: The castle was built........
Textbooks, cds, dvds, internet webquests, maps
http:
Middle Ages:
www.euroaventura.ne/documentacio/medieval.php
Expectations
At the end of this unit all the children must
  • Build up a cardboard castle
  • Handle a castle book
  • Read and understand texts about life in the Middle Ages.
  • Practise dialogues
  • Writing an application form to take a course at Canterbury Language School.
  • Acting out an extract of a “ Canterbury tale”: The Wife of Bath’s Tale”
At the end of this unit most of the children should
Have learned about Life in The Middle Ages and English Medieval Literature.
At the end of this unit some of the children could
Have developed skills to describe, analyse, talk about Middle Ages





Lessons Overview
Lesson
Learning goals
Learning outcomes
Main activity
Assessment criteria
1
The castle and its parts.
Uses of the simple past.
Descriptive texts
The Keep: simple past, descriptive text.
Being able to use the basic vocabulary to write the name of the different parts of a castle on a drawing. Understanding the uses of the parts of the castles.
Completing sentences about the Keep.
Drawing
The hall of the castle following the description.
THE CASTLE.
Reading text with the explanation of the different parts of a Norman castle. Students write the names on the drawing.
Inside the Keep:
a) Students read a text and write the different parts of the Keep on the drawing.
b) Students complete the sentences
c) Students draw the hall of a castle
.
Uses of the simple past.
Descriptive texts
2. The Keep and its parts
Uses of the simple past
Descriptive texts.
2
Life in monasteries
Vocabulary on monasteries
Vocabulary on abbeys.
The cloisters, where………..
Being able to pronounce,name and distinguish and identify the vocabulary of an abbey.
Being able to talk about life in abbeys using simple structures.
THE MONASTERIES
Reading text about monasteries.
Students look at the drawing and translate in to Spanish the parts of the monasteries.
ABBEYS
Students write the names of the arts of Rievaulx Abbey on the Ground-Plan.
Students read a text and and complete sentences : “ What was it used for?”
.
Life in monasteries
Vocabulary on monasteries
Vocabulary on abbeys.
Writing about the uses of the different parts of the abbey .
Talking about an abbey.
3
Norman houses.
Vocabulary on manor-houses.
A poor man’s cottage
Being able to pronounce, name and distinguish the parts of a Norman house.
Understanding the information of a text and answering some questions.
Reading and understanding the information of a text about cottages in the Middle Ages.

.
NORMAN HOUSES.
a) Students read a text about Norman houses. They answer some comprehension questions.
b) Students read some information about The kings Manor and answer some questions.
c) Students complete the sentences using the words in the box
d) Write on plan different names of the house.
e) Describing a poor man’s cottage in your own words.
f) Writing some names on a drawing of a village.
Life in Norman houses.
Vocabulary on Norman houses.
Writing about Norman houses.
Interpreting information about Norman houses.
A cottage
The parts of a Medieval village.
4
Village life
Vocabulary about village life.
Being able to understand a text about village life and identifying the different social relationships that existed in those times
VILLAGE LIFE.
a)Students complete sentences about life in a village-
Life in village
Social relationships
5
Town life
Vocabulary: Charter, gild, apprenticeship, etc.
Being able to understand a text about town life.
TOWN LIFE
a) Completing sentences about the information the text provides.
b) Drawing signs of shopkeepers
Life in town
Craftsmen and shopkeepers.
6
Streets in town
Vocabulary: arches, doorways, market place, town cross, cobbles.
Being able to understand a text about streets in the town.
STREETS IN TOWN
a)Reading a passage and looking up words they don’t understand
b)Writing some sentences describing a town in the Middle Ages.
Streets in town
Vocabulary: arches, doorways, market place, town cross, cobbles.
7
Canterbury Tales
Vocabulary: vain, introverted, successful, good at
Being able to know the most representative literary works of Medieval literature in England
CANTERBURY TALES:
a)Reading about the Wife of Bath’s Tale
b) giving opinions of women
Canterbury tales





Lesson # 1

Learning objectives
Learning outcomes
Evidence for Assessment
Knowing the origins of Medieval castles in Europe
Naming, writing and distinguishing the parts of a castle.
Being able to lebel the different parts of a castle.
Being able to find information about life in Medieval castles
Discourse/Text targeted
Language targeted- Non-verbal L Targeted
Word, Sentence, Descriptive text
Vocabulary : castles, the Keep, monasteries, abbeys, houses, villages, towns and streets.
Outline of leading activities
Activities based on texts describing life in the Middle Ages. They are all based on reading comprehension and gap-filling type.
Classroom Management
Timing
Grouping
Pupils
Teacher
Resources
3’
Routines
18 students in pairs
-Students answer: “Fine, thank you, and you?
- The responsible child introduces the date, weather and feeling “Today is 16th March 2012, it’s warm and sunny and I’m feeling happy, tired, hungry, etc,”


sunny sunnnn
-The teacher comes into the classroom and greets children-“How are you today”
-The teacher answers “Fine, thanks”
Blackboard
A piece of chalk
Face card (classroom decoration)
2’

Students open their books
The teacher gives appropiate instructions related to recurrent classroom activities: “Open your books at page.....” “We are going to start a new unit : Life in the Middle Ages”
Textbook
20’

Students answer the questions. They talk about walls, gates, dungeons. They tell the rest of the class what they know about castles in Europe.
Students answer that the symbol is “ the symbol is the knight”
The teacher shows them a big picture of a Medieval castle. She brings along a craft of a medieval castle. (They have already made one in primary at the moment they were learning the geometrical figures).
She asks them if there are any Medieval castles around or if they have visited some of the impressive ones that exist in France. (Loira’s Valley).
The teachers explains that the concept of castle emerges in Europe during the IX th century when Charlemagne defended his border posts building up wooden castles. Then, when castles started to be built up of stone became the residence of feudal landlords.
The teacher asks them what the symbol, of feudal times was. She explains them the life of nobility: The way of life, their eating habits and leisure
Photographs and posters of Medieval castles taken from magazines: authentic material and adapted/graded one.

weblandia.com/castillos/glosario.htm
10’

Students’ learning outcomes show motivation and understanding
The teacher pre-teaches vocabulary: gateway, moat, portcullis, pointed iron fence, outer baley. She explains the meaning of words without translation and she also makes use of pictures.


5’

Students read the text carefully with the teacher.
The teacher reads the text aloud.


10’

Students draw the different parts of the castle on the drawing.
The teachers asks them to write the names of the different parts of the castle on the drawing


5’

Students
The teachers asks them to search for information about castles: who lived there, how they were used, etc.

Assessment Criteria
All children must be able to:
Label the parts of a castle
Most of the children will be able to:
Search for information about life in Castles
Some of the children could:
Tell the class what the ceremony to knight somebody was like.
Lesson # 2

Learning objectives
Learning outcomes
Evidence for Assessment
Learning the keep of the Castle
Students write parts of the keep
complete sentences and draw the hall
How well they wrote the parts of the hall
How well they completed the sentences
How well they drew the hall
Dicourse/Text targeted
Language targeted- Non-verbal L Targeted
Word –sentence-Text
Vocabulary about the keep: battlements, Great hall, store rooms
Non verbal: Visual aids: pictures and drawings
Outline of leading activities
Activities based on texts describing life in the Middle Ages. They are all based on reading comprehension and gap-filling type.
Classroom Management
Timing
Grouping
Pupils
Teacher
Resources
3’
Routines
18 students in pairs
-Students answer: “Fine, thank you, and you?
- The responsible child introduces the date, weather and feeling “Today is 16th March 2012, it’s warm and sunny and I’m feeling happy, tired, hungry, etc,”


sunny sunnnn
-The teacher comes into the classroom and greets children-“How are you today”
-The teacher answers “Fine, thanks”
Blackboard
A piece of chalk
Face card (classroom decoration)
2’

Students open their books, listen to the teacher.
Body language showing their attitude towards the topic
The teacher gives appropiate instructions related to recurrent classroom activities: “Open your books at page.....” “We are going to continue with the unit : Life in the Middle Ages”
Textbook
5’
In pairs
Students observe in detail the parts of the Keep. Each one has his own drawing. They discuss in pairs.
The teacher shows them a picture of the Keep a medieval castle. She explains to them it is important to know about the arrangement of the keep of a castle.
The teacher asks them to discuss in pairs what each floor is and what it was meant for.




The teacher pre-teaches vocabulary: battlements, Great Hall, stone slab, dungeons.
She explains the meaning of what she considers are the most important words they should learn.

15’
In pairs
Students read carefully, underline words of the text. They compare their predictions and the information of the text.
The teacher reads the text aloud. She points out to the picture at the same time (visual aids)



Students write the different parts of a Keep on the drawing
The teacher asks them to write the different parts of the keep on the drawing



Students complete sentences with the parts of a Keep


Students draw the hall of the castle following the description.
The teacher asks them to complete sentences:
In the battlemnts…….
The lord and his important visitors slept………..
Other people slept………….
They had their meals in……………
The store-room was for…………………..
The dungeon was for…………

The teacher asks them to draw the hall of the castle following the description.

Assessment Criteria
All children must be able to
Recognise the parts of the keep
Most of the children will be able to
Write, pronounce and name the parts of the keep
Some of the children could
Talk about the arrangement of the keep of a castle in Middle ages within the framework oid a feudal society.













Lesson # 3

Learning objectives
Learning outcomes
Evidence for Assessment
Learning about monasteries and abbeys
Students read text and look up words they do not know
They write the names of the parts of Rievaulx Abbey on the ground plan
How well they looked up words in dictionaries.
How well they wrote the parts of a monastery
How well they wrote the names of the parts of an abbey on a ground plan
How well they completed sentences with given information
Dicourse/Text targeted
Languaje targeted- Non-verbal L Targeted
Word-sentence-text
monasteries, barons, bishops, cloisters, almonry, refectory, parlour, calefactorium, irfirmary
Non verbal: visual aids.
Outline of leading activities
Activities based on texts describing life in the Middle Ages. They are all based on reading comprehension and gap-filling type.
Classroom Management
Timing
Grouping
Pupils
Teacher
Resources
3’
Routines
18 students in pairs
-Students answer: “Fine, thank you, and you?
- The responsible child introduces the date, weather and feeling “Today is 16th March 2012, it’s warm and sunny and I’m feeling happy, tired, hungry, etc,”


sunny sunnnn
-The teacher comes into the classroom and greets children-“How are you today”
-The teacher answers “Fine, thanks”

10’

Students listen to the teacher. They are given the drawing with the text.
The teacher explains the importance of monasteries in the Middle Ages.
She shows students a drawing
Then she provides them with pictures of monasteries and abbeys : France: Loira’s Valley

15’

Students listen to the teacher’s pronunciation of new words: refectory, almonry, cellars, chapter house, cloisters
Students listen carefully to the teacher.
Teacher pre-teaches: refectory, almonry, cellars, chapter house, cloisters .
She reads the text about monasteries
She asks them to look up the words they do not understand

10’

Students listen carefully to the pronunciation and pay attention to content.


Students complete sentences following the given structure
The teacher reads the test of Rievaulx Abbey


The teacher asks them to complete sentences with information.
There are many buildings in a monastery:
- the almonry, where……
- the cloisters, where……..
- the infirmary, where……
- The refectory, where…….
- The dormitory, where………
- The chapter house, where……
- The parlour, where….
- The warming room or the calefactorium, where……..

Assessment Criteria
All children must be able to
Recognise the parts of a monastery and abbey
Most of the children will be able to:
Write, pronounce and name the parts of a monastery and an abbey.
Some of the children could:
Talk about a monastery and an abbey in the Middle ages within the framework of a feudal society.













Lesson # 4

Learning objectives
Learning outcomes
Evidence for Assessment
Learning about Norman houses
Learning about Medieval cottages
Students answer questions about the text.
Students understand the information on a historic building
Students understand a text and are able to describe with their own words a poor man’s cottage
How well students answer questions about a text
How well students understand d the information on a historic building
How well students complete sentences using the words in the box.
Dicourse/Text targeted
Language targeted- Non-verbal L Targeted
Word-sentence-text
Stone, manor, trestle tables, cottages, thatched roof.

Non-verbal: visual aids
Outline of leading activities
Activities based on texts describing life in the Middle Ages. They are all based on reading comprehension and gap-filling type.


Activities based on texts describing life in the Middle Ages. They are all based on reading comprehension and gap-filling type.
Classroom Management
Timing
Grouping
Pupils
Teacher
Resources
3’
Routines
18 students in pairs
-Students answer: “Fine, thank you, and you?
- The responsible child introduces the date, weather and feeling “Today is …….. March 2012, it’s warm and sunny and I’m feeling happy, tired, hungry, etc,”


sunny sunnnn
-The teacher comes into the classroom and greets children-“How are you today”
-The teacher answers “Fine, thanks”

10’
pairs
Students listen to the teacher They answer questions.
In pairs they label the parts of the manor house
The teacher explains the importance of manor houses in Medieval Times and the relationship they have with feudalism. She shows them a drawing of a Norman house. She asks them questions about the picture.

15’

Students listen carefully to the teacher.
Students answer the questions
The teacher reads the text about norman houses and asks the students to answer questions:
“What was a manor house like?”
“Have you seen a similar one in Spain?”

10’

Students read information about the King’s Manor.
They answer some questions
The teacher shows students the plan of Stokesay manor house. She asks them to write the solar, keep and Hall on the map.


15’

Students read about a poor man’s cottage and describe it in their own words.
The teacher pre-teaches words : framed cottages, wooden beams, stalls, wooden shutters, open hearth.
The teacher reads a text about a poor man’s cottage.


5’

The students write the following words on a drawing.
The teacher asks the students to write the following words: Manor –house; Wall; Church; Cross; Cottages and Priest’s house

Assessment Criteria
All children must be able to
Recognise the parts of a cottage
Most of the children will be able to
Pronounce, name and write the parts of a cottage
Some of the children could
Talk about a man’s cottage
















Lesson # 5

Learning objectives
Learning outcomes
Evidence for Assessment
Learning about village life
Learning about town life
Students read a text about village life.
Students read a but town life
How well students have understood the text completing some sentences.
How well students understood the text completing some sentences about time life.
Dicourse/Text targeted
Language targeted- Non-verbal L Targeted
Word-sentence-text
Barons, knights, abbots, villeins, oath of loyalty, homage.
Charter, court, cobbled, gild.
Outline of leading activities
Activities based on texts describing life in the Middle Ages. They are all based on reading comprehension and gap-filling type.
Classroom Management
Timing
Grouping
Pupils
Teacher
Resources
3’
Routines
18 students in pairs
-Students answer: “Fine, thank you, and you?
- The responsible child introduces the date, weather and feeling “Today is ………March 2012, it’s warm and sunny and I’m feeling happy, tired, hungry, etc,”


sunny sunnnn
-The teacher comes into the classroom and greets children-“How are you today”
-The teacher answers “Fine, thanks”

10’

Students read the text about village life.
The teacher pre-teaches words: Barons, knights, abbots, villeins, oath of loyalty, homage.
The teacher shows them a picture of a village
He reads a text about village life

15’

Students complete some sentences about the text
The teacher asks the students to complete some sentences about the text
The English peasants were known as…….
The lord gave some lands to the…..and kept the rest for…………….
The villain promised to serve the lord with………..
In return for his land the villain had to………….. and supply…………him with.
The villain could not marry without …………..
His lord was expected to……………….
A few villagers were………………


15’

Students draw some possible signs town people used in the middle Ages.
The teacher shows signs that people in the Middle Ages used because they did not know to read.
She asks them to think up some more possible signs and draw them




The students listen carefully to the teacher.
The teacher reads the text about Streets in town.




The students write some sentences describing the Town in the Middle Ages.
The teacher asks the students to write some sentences describing the town in the Middle A.

Assessment Criteria
All children must be able to
Recognise the village life and town life and streets in town
Most of the children will be able to
Pronounce, name and write the characteristics of village life and town life
Some of the children could
Talk about village and town life













Lesson # 6

Learning objectives
Learning outcomes
Evidence for Assessment
Learning about the concept of pilgrimage
Learning about “The Canterbury Tales”
Filling in a grid
Matching adjectives with a pilgrim “Wife of Bath”
How well they fill in the grid.
How well students back up answers from passage
Discourse/Text targeted
Language targeted- Non-verbal L Targeted
Word-sentence-text
Sacrlet, skilful at, surpassed, somewhat deaf, humble, strong-willed, clumpsy.
Non verbal: Picture of pilgrimage and pilgrim.
Map of the England (Canterbury- London)
Outline of leading activities

Classroom Management
Timing
Grouping
Pupils
Teacher
Resources
5-10’
Whole class
Students participate actively. They answer questions.
They show their knowledge about the subject
The teacher elicits all they know about the subject.
She shows them a picture of Santiago cathedral. “What is this?” people go there. The teacher shows them a picture of a traditional pilgrim. She writes on the board the words PILGRIM/PILGRIMAGE .
The teacher asks what other places there were pilgrimages: ( Santiago, Rome, Jerusalem ) and in England? CANTERBURY. The teacher shows of a picture of Canterbury Cathedral plus a map of where it is in relation to London.
The teacher asks why pilgrimages went to Canterbury Cathedral. She says they went to visit the tomb of St. Thomas Becket. She adds there is a church in Toro (Zamora), dedicated to Saint Thomas Becket.
The teacher elicits if they know any work of literature about the Pilgrimage to Canterbury. If they don’t she tells them “Chaucer –Canterbury Tales” She shows them a picture of Chaucer and practices the pronunciation of Canterbury. The teacher asks them what language Chaucer wrote in and why he was famous.

25’

Students answer . They give their their opinions.
Students read the text and fillin the grid
The teacher asks the students what kind of people went on pilgrimages and why. She shows a picture of the “Wife of Bath”She gets them to guess what kind of person she is (occupation/ married/ divorced/income/travels/what good at? She points out Bath on a map. The teacher says “The wife of Bath” is perhaps the most famous of all the Canterbury pilgrims, and perhaps, the one about whom, there is least agreement among critics.
-The teacher asks students to read a text and fill in grid

10’
Pair/group/class debate

- The teacher asks them to decide which of these adjectives could be used to describe her.
She asks them to back up their answers by quoting from the passage


5’
Whole class
Students answer what a woman wants most of all.
Extensive reading
Extensive reading: in class the teacher brainstorms: “What does a woman want most of all?”
(At home students read the story and compare what they said in class with what characters in the story say about what a woman wants).

Assessment Criteria

All children must be able to
Distinguish where Canterbury is located on a map of England.
Name at least one tale “ The Wife of Bath’s Tale”
Most of the children will be able to

Use descriptive adjectives
Fill in grids, answer questions about a text
Some of the children could
Talk and give their opinion about the woman inn the tale and women nowadays.













Lesson # 7

Learning objectives
Learning outcomes
Evidence for Assessment
Learning to write an application form
Ask how to get to places
Make a phone call
Learning to write an application form
Ask how to get to places
Make a phone call
How well they write an application form
How well they ssk how to get to places
Make a phone call
Dicourse/Text targeted
Language targeted- Non-verbal L Targeted
Word-sentece-text
How can I get to, watch bout for signs….
Outline of leading activities
Role play, writing (lay out of application form), how to make a phone call
Classroom Management
Timing
Grouping
Pupils
Teacher
Resources


Students comment whether they agree with the tale that what women want the most is to be able to make their husbands do whatever they wish
The teacher asks them their opinion about the reading
The Wife of Bath” simplified version extensive reading
20’
pairs
Students write application form.
Role play
The teacher asks students to read a brochure on Pilgrim Language School.
They write and application letter to attend a course at Pilgrim Language school.
Role play: The teachers asks them to make a phone call checking details to make a booking



Simulate
The teacher asks students to practice a dialogue (simulation) They have a map of Canterbury and they are outside East Station.






Assessment Criteria
All children must be able to
Make a call
Write an application for in a guided way
Most of the children will be able to
Perform role plays and simulations
Some of the children could
Engage in a conversation in Canterbury

















I would suggest you to use some of the ideas included in this lesson about William the Conqueror to retell and represent thoughts
Besides your could also use descriptive texts similar to the ones offered in this lessons about Tudor's values, it is a unit designed for KS2 Primary Education but you could adapt it to your Secondary Learners (a second suggestion)

a possible idea Schoolworld